ATC Hazards

The Applied Technology Council (ATC) has made a web tool for determining structural hazards by location. This is a useful tool to document code specified design values for snow, wind, seismic loading criteria. You can find their tool at https://hazards.atcouncil.org/#/ .

About the ATC:

The Applied Technology Council (ATC) is a nonprofit, tax-exempt corporation established in 1973 through the efforts of the Structural Engineers Association of California. ATC’s mission is to develop and promote state-of-the-art, user-friendly engineering resources and applications for use in mitigating the effects of natural and other hazards on the built environment. ATC also identifies and encourages needed research and develops consensus opinions on structural engineering issues in a nonproprietary format. ATC thereby fulfills a unique role in funded information transfer.

ATC is guided by a Board of Directors consisting of representatives appointed by the American Society of Civil Engineers, the National Council of Structural Engineers Associations, the Structural Engineers Association of California, the Structural Engineers Association of New York, the Western Council of Structural Engineers Associations, and four at-large representatives concerned with the practice of structural engineering. Each director serves a three-year term.

Project management and administration are carried out by a full-time Executive Director and support staff. Project work is conducted by a wide range of highly qualified consulting professionals, thus incorporating the experience of many individuals from academia, research, and professional practice who would not be available from any single organization. Funding for ATC projects is obtained from government agencies and from the private sector in the form of tax-deductible contributions.

The corporate headquarters for ATC is located in Redwood City, California, with a satellite office in Arlington, Virginia.

Their sponsors include

Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA)
www.fema.gov

Insurance Institute for Business & Home Safety (IBHS)
disastersafety.org

Metal Building Manufacturers Association (MBMA)
www.mbma.com

Carport Central
www.carportcentral.com

American Iron and Steel Institute
www.steel.org

Could construction admin services have prevented downtown Montreal flooding?

Proper planning or perhaps an engineering services for construction administration could have possibly prevented a major flooding of downtown Montreal.  Soil around an aged water pipe may have shifted during construction work causing  the 47″diameter pipe to break and pour out 10.5 million gallons of water into the downtown streets in just 2 hours.

Moments before the water main broke, crews were working at a construction site at the McTavish reservoir near McGill University’s downtown campus.

The city’s water service said it’s possible the construction work near the water main caused the soil to shift, which led to the break.

Saeed Mirza is a professor emeritus at McGill University who specializes in structural engineering and the rehabilitation of infrastructure.

Mirza said the city should have known the pipe was vulnerable and taken the necessary precautions.

“It’s nearly a 100-year-old pipe. If the pipe was weakened, then any soil movement could easily fracture it,” he said. “Some engineer should have visualized this earlier.”

via [Montreal flooding linked to construction work – Montreal – CBC News.]